It was going to happen. Sure, it felt like the Royals were never going to lose, but trust me, it was going to happen. The Royals fall 3-1 to the Twins on Wednesday in Minnesota.

It was a straight-up pitcher’s duel. Edinson Volquez was nails for the Royals. He got off to a slow start, allowing the first three hitters of the game to reach, but settled down and allowed only two baserunners until Torii Hunter forced him from the game with a two out single in the eighth. Unfortunately those two were a Plouffe single followed by an Arcia home run. Ballgame. Twins.

The bats slumbered as the Royals once again turned Kyle Gibson into the pitcher of the century. But let’s focus on the positive because there was plenty of good things to note from this one.

— Starting with Volquez. He had all his pitches working. Fastball, curve and change. He located his pitches extremely well and had the Twins hitters mostly off balance for most of the evening. The curve had some outstanding break, dropping off the table, but it was the change that was the hammer Volquez swung with ferocity. He threw his change 35 times and got 27 strikes with that pitch. Twins batters swung at the Volquez change 24 times and missed on 12 of them. An amazing 50 percent swing and miss rate. Amazing undersells it, actually.

You know my skepticism regarding Volquez. Namely, his track record of spotty control was a concern of mine when the Royals signed him. Now, through two starts and 15.2 innings, Volquez has walked just two batters. One in each start. And, as I mentioned earlier, his command was impeccable. We’re dealing with a small sample, but from what I’ve seen in his two starts, let’s just say I’m very encouraged.

Volquez said Perez called for a change on the home run to Arcia. He shook off his catcher and left a two-seam fastball up in the zone. Interesting. Volquez gave a great postgame interview. Thoughtful, reflective and honest. Solid character. You can understand why Dayton Moore signed him.

— Speaking of Volquez, he’s impressed me with his awareness on the mound. We saw it in the sixth when Hosmer laid out for a ground ball and had it pop out of his glove. It dribbled to Omar Infante, who picked it up and quickly threw to Volquez covering first. Your textbook 3-4-1 play if you were scoring at home. Credit to Volquez for doing what he was supposed to do, which was to keep running to the bag. A small thing, to be sure, but something that was impressive none the less.

— Alex Gordon has been scuffling at the plate, but ripped a 3-0 pitch to right to drive in the lone Royals run of the evening. I heartily endorse this approach. Gibson was cruising and didn’t want to put another runner on base. Gordon sat dead red and executed.

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Hopefully, this will give Gordon a little push to get going.

— Mike Moustakas continued his assault on the opposite field, collecting a bunt single in the first and another single on a soft liner in the fourth. I know I said this was going to be positive, but jeez… Moustakas has the plate appearance with the highest leverage index in the game in the seventh with two on and two out.


Source: FanGraphs

In the chart above, you can easily find the Moustakas PA. The Twins summoned lefty Brian Duensing and he retired Moustakas on one pitch. One stinking pitch. Stop me if you’ve heard this before: A pop-up to third.

So let’s say that as encouraging as it may be that Moustakas is going to the opposite field, he can still fall into the old habits and frustrate. He’s a work in progress. Will he succeed? I remain skeptical. Although I will always give him credit for attempting. And there is evidence that it will improve his performance. How much exactly remains to be see. However, after last year, he can’t go much lower.

— Not only did the Royals not hit a home run for the first time this season, they also failed to collect a walk in a game for the first time of the year. Coincidence they lost? I think not.

— I’ll give the final word to former Toastmaster Ken Arneson:

Very true.