There will be baseball today in Surprise, Arizona. It won’t mean anything with regard to the upcoming season, but it is baseball nonetheless.

Two of the Royals’ pitchers who are tentatively scheduled to pitch this afternoon are twenty-two year old Jandel Gustave and thirty-one year old Yohan Pino. If either wants to head north in April with the big league club, they have some work to do.

Gustave was a Rule 5 pick of the Red Sox who was then traded to the Royals for cash (American, by the way). Despite the trade, he comes with all the trappings of a Rule 5 pick and will have to stay on the big league roster all season or be offered back to his original team, the Astros. Here is Gustave by the numbers:

  • 100 – the velocity of his fastball
  • 67 – walks issued in his two seasons in the Dominican Summer League….in 45 innings.
  • 13 – hit batters last season in 79 A-ball innings
  • 14 – wild pitches last season

So, you get the picture, right?

Gustave throws really, really hard. He has limited control of anything that is not a fastball and, let’s face it, minimal control of the fastball.  Jandel has good strikeout numbers in his five minor league seasons (2 in the Dominican, 2 in Rookie ball and last year in Low-A) – right at a strikeout per inning.  Good, not eye popping.  He does have eye-popping or maybe eye-bleeding control numbers. After walking 8.7 batter per 9 innings in 2012, Gustave cut his walk rate drastically by last season (just 3.3 BB/9), but keep in mind that rate does not count the 13 batters he hit.  To steal the line from a movie and countless others:  “I have no idea where the ball is going…really.”

What the Royals are going to be looking for this spring is if Gustave can get the ball over the plate enough to log some innings when the team is up 10 or down 10.  If he can get the ball over the plate a semi-reasonable amount of the time, one would think the team could stash him as the seventh reliever in a deep bullpen.  The slot likely will only needs to get through 30 low leverage innings, but you have to be able to get through them. If Gustave can’t throw strikes or stop hitting batters, he cannot even occupy that role.  Of course if the Royals go with eight relievers……well, that’s a column for another day.

If young and raw describes Gustave, then old and weathered is Yohan Pino.

Pino finally made the majors for the first time last season, starting 11 games for the Twins.  Featuring a high 80’s fastball. backed by a slider, changeup and an occasional curve, Pino posted an earned run average of 5.07.  His FIP of 3.94 indicates Pino may have been better than that.

In the minors, Pino has been in AA or AAA since 2007 and amassed 1,105 total innings splitting time between the bullpen and the rotation. Yohan has posted a career minor league strikeout rate of 8.1/9:  a number that has held reasonably well at the AAA level.  Coupled with a decent walk rate and average home run rate and you have a guy who is a pitcher, not a thrower. Now, is he a good enough pitcher?

In Pino, the Royals have a guy who has been a swingman basically his entire professional life. He even closed some for Louisville in 2013, so there is no role that is foreign to him. Let’s face it, at thirty-one any role that involves travelling on a charter jet would be welcome.  On the surface and maybe in real life, Pino seems like a nice guy to have as your number six or seven reliever, capable of eating up garbage innings on a bad (or really good) night and ready to make that spot start.  Temper that thought, however, with knowing that he has put up some of his best number being an old guy in AAA.

It never hurts to have a Pino in your inventory, but it usually doesn’t hurt to not have one, either.   The Royals are his sixth organization (seven if you count the Twins twice), so a lot of eyes have had a look at Yohan and decided they could live without him.  I think he likely has a real shot at the last bullpen spot, especially if the Royals decide keeping Gustave would be just too painful.  If not there, he is likely candidate number one to get the call from Omaha if one of the starters goes down.

We won’t get much of a hint today about what the future holds for either of these guys, but we will have baseball and these two will pitch.  The over/under on balls to the screen by Gustave is two, by the way.