On Monday, Royals backup catcher entered the game as a replacement for starter Salvador Perez in the seventh inning. (Perez exited with right knee soreness. More on that in a moment.)

Kratz saw three pitches.

Kratz hit two home runs.

Let’s just let Gameday illustrate.

Plate appearance number one:

Kratz HR1

Plate appearance number two:

Kratz HR2

Kratz has a little bit of pop – he hit 18 home runs in limited action for the Phillies in 2011 and 2012 – but to enter the game in the seventh inning and launch not one, but two home runs? Ned Yost is playing with house money. That’s not to give Yost credit. Perez left the game with an injury. Just to say Yost – and the Royals – are living right. One of their key players exits and the backup answers the bell. Get on board. Seriously. Get on board now.

The Kratz bombs gave Ned Yost the luxury of holding Greg Holland back for a single out. Before the inevitable Aaron Crow implosion that created a save situation. The final cushion of two runs was provided by Mr. Kratz.

As I said, if you weren’t on the bandwagon before, you best get your butt on board.

The Royals are 14 games above .500 for the first time since August 9, 1994. They have a two game lead on Detroit. They are two and a half games behind Baltimore for the second seed in the playoffs. Man, I don’t know. This is some rare air.

The Kratz Cameo may get in the way of the other storyline – the dominance of Jason Vargas. Seriously, this guy is pitching lights out.  Seven innings, three hits, a walk and three strikeouts. The only blemish was the Oswaldo Arcia home run in the seventh. Vargas mixed his four and two-seam fastballs with a lethal change-up. He threw 35 change-ups and got seven swings and misses. It was an irresistible pitch as the Twins offered at 21 of those. The only hit they collected on the change was the aforementioned home run to Arcia. It was a change inner-half. Arcia waited, kept his hands in, and barreled the ball. Crushed it was more like it. But if Vargas is going to be so nasty with that pitch, we can forgive a moment where a hitter turns on one.

Arcia HR

It’s a tip your cap kind of thing.

The change has always been Vargas’s best pitch. It’s been effective again for him this year. His walk and home run rates are down, and he’s dropped his xFIP to a career-low 4.05. The interesting thing is he’s throwing fewer pitches in the zone. He’s throwing just 40 percent of his pitches in the zone, but hitters are chasing 34 percent of his pitches that are outside the strike zone. That’s keeping them off balance and preventing hitters from barreling the ball. Otherwise, they’re making contact, but he’s content with letting the Royals defense do the heavy lifting. You really can’t argue with that recipe. It feels like he should be able to keep rolling. Maybe not as good as he has been since returning from his appendectomy. But good enough to keep his team in any game he starts.

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As I mentioned before, Perez left the game with a sore right knee. Ned Yost said he tweaked it running the bases in the fifth and termed him “day to day.” Under normal circumstances, I’d mock Yost and any diagnosis he would give. But I’m not stupid. I’m not betting against Ned Yost.

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If you frequent Fangraphs, you may have noticed the WAR leaderboard on Monday morning:

Alex Gordon – 5.7
Mike Trout – 5.6
Giancarlo Stanton – 5.1
Josh Donaldson – 5.1
Robinson Cano – 5.0

The leaderboard only confirms what we in Kansas City have known since Gordon exploded in 2011: Alex Gordon is one of the most complete players in baseball. He hits, he fields, he throws, he runs. He does it all.

The “Five Tool Player” is romanticized. I mean, there’s only one Willie Mays. Or Mickey Mantle. In the modern game, it’s Mike Trout. But I’ll submit that Gordon is a five-tool player in his own right. He may not lead the league in home runs or stolen bases, but he will give you enough power and speed to go along with his spectacular defense that he’s one of the few five-tool players in baseball today. And Ned Yost continues to hit him fifth. Ok.

In 2011, Gordon had the seventh best fWAR in the AL and somehow netted just three votes for MVP. All were 10th place votes. (Shame on the KC chapter of the BBWAA for that one. Not a good look.) This year, I suspect he will do a little better.

Gordon is simply one of the best, most complete players in the game.