We are almost a quarter through the regular season. The Royals have played 40 games and won 26, marking the best start in franchise history.

Here are a few random notes:

— The Royals are second in the American League in On Base Percentage at .338. This is a seismic shift in Kansas City baseball. Granted, this is fueled by an obscenely elevated BABIP of .322. They still refuse to take a walk. At 5.4 percent, their walk rate isn’t just in the bottom of the AL, it’s practically subterranean. In fact, I went all the way back to 1960 in the American League. There wasn’t a single team that finished with a walk rate below six percent. The Royals aren’t just doing things their own damn way, they’re setting fire to conventional wisdom along the way.

— While the Royals are getting on base at a quality clip, their current leader in OBP? None other than Mike Moustakas. His .396 OPB edges Eric Hosmer by a single point. Still, a lead is a lead, no matter how slim.

To me, nothing underscores the insanity of the first quarter of this season than Moustakas leading in any offensive category. OBP? Get out of here.

— If I had an All-Star Game ballot:

C – Stephen Vogt
1B – Eric Hosmer
2B – Jason Kipnis
3B – Mike Moustakas
SS – Jose Iglesias
LF – Alex Gordon
CF – Mike Trout
RF – Josh Reddick
DH – Nelson Cruz

That’s three Royals and it hurt to give the nod to Trout over Lorenzo Cain. Cain has the edge defensively (duh), but Trout’s offensive numbers are otherworldly. His offensive edge over Cain is larger than Cain’s defensive edge. For reserves, you could certainly make a case for Salvador Perez and Cain is definitely on the team. Add Wade Davis for good measure and you have six deserving Royals. Six.

It’s almost as if “Ken Harvey, All-Star” never happened. Almost.

(By the way, I know that technically everyone has an All-Star ballot. Except those ballots don’t exist anymore. The only way you can vote is online.)

— If you’ve read this blog for any number of posts, you know I don’t have much time for RBI. I do, however, enjoy RBI%. Basically, that’s just the percentage of the number of baserunner who come around to score. This year, the Royals are scoring a whopping 18 percent of all baserunners. Most teams are clustered around the 14 percent rate, which is the league average. At the other end of the spectrum, the lowest scoring teams plate around 12 percent of their baserunners, or two percentage points off the average. The Royals are outpacing the league by four percentage points. Impressive.

In the last 10 years, a handful of teams have scored 17 percent of their runners. No one has scored 18 percent. It’s still very early, so there’s plenty of time for regression here, but this is an impressive start.

— Lorenzo Cain is a defensive god.

According to The Fielding Bible, he leads the universe with 13 defensive runs saved.

How amazing is that? Among teams, just four have more than 13 defensive runs saved. (Blue Jays, Diamondbacks, Giants, and of course, Royals.) Teams!

— This may be the most fun I’ve ever had watching baseball. This team is beating their opponents in myriad ways. They are hitting doubles, they are getting (sometimes) solid starting pitching, the lockdown bullpen… The thing that struck me from their last game against the Reds was how they scored. Of the first five runs the Royals tallied, four of them scored when the Royals batter hit into an out. Here’s how they scored:

Sac Fly
Fielder’s Choice
Sac Fly
Single
Double Play

Just another night at the ballpark.