These Royals. Man.

Offensively impotent for eight innings. Then a Alcides Escobar single and an Alex Gordon home run. Everyone goes home happy.

Just wow. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a game like that from the Royals. With the stakes so high. That’s what makes these games Must-See TV. Anything can happen. And in this season, there’s a better than average chance it probably will.

Let’s rewind ourselves.

Let’s start with the oft-discussed lineup.

I added the “getting there…” at the end because I felt (and feel) this is probably the most optimal lineup we will see from Ned Yost. He’s always going to hit a middle infielder second because dammit, that’s where a middle infielder has to hit. Just like the speed guys goes number one. But what I liked about this lineup was the Gordon/Butler/Perez/Willingham middle. Sure, stacking three right-handed batters may not be ideal for the later innings, but these guys need to be in the middle of the lineup. Obviously, you could drop Perez, but with this offense, who do you put in his place? Anyway, this is probably my favorite Yost lineup of the year. The game started and there was not much offense. In fact, our man Danny Duffy was doing some good pitching things.

That would be Denny Matthews on the radio, speaking in the third inning. Of course, the Duff Man didn’t throw a no-hitter, but he was sharp. Throwing fastball, curve and change, he went 6.2 innings, gave up four hits, two walks and struck out four. Duffy’s trouble came in the seventh when he allowed a leadoff double to Brian Dozier and a single to Joe Mauer. I don’t think Duffy was tired at that point – he was still throwing 94 mph – but he didn’t locate as well in those plate appearances as he did earlier in the game, leaving both pitches up in the zone.

Yost pulled Duffy after 95 pitches and two outs in the seventh. It was the right call. Bring in Kelvin Herrera to face the right-handed batter. Let Herrera throw his 100 mph smoke. Then, I liked Yost sticking with Herrera in the eighth before going to Wade Davis in the ninth. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

This was the first attendance tweet I saw. It quickly devolved into the Kansas City media calling out Royals fans.

Stop. And really, don’t ever. For starters, you get to go to games for free. As part of your job. How dare you call out fans for not showing up on a late August Tuesday night game against the Twins. Would I have liked to seen more? Sure. But I understand. Tickets are expensive. School is back in session. Fall activities are in full swing. And while the Royals are in the thick of a pennant race, can you blame the fans for being a little hesitant to embrace this team? We haven’t really been in this situation recently. We come by our skepticism naturally, built up over the last 29 years. If we want to take our time to get fully on board, who are you to try to speed up our process. I’m guessing the Labor Day weekend games will be packed. And the remaining home stands will be equally boisterous if the Royals can maintain their position.

I’m sure there are studies out there, but it seems to be the true attendance bump comes the year following the initial success. That’s when you grow your season ticket base and when you become the “it” thing to do. String together three or four successful seasons and you have 40,000-plus on a regular basis. (Well, not in Kansas City. Maybe 35,000 after the renovations. But you know what I mean.) If you want a comparable look, turn to Pittsburg last year. They were drawing in the low 20s on September weekdays while they were in the hunt for the wild card. That is what happens when you get into a pennant chase after 20 years of losing seasons. Fans are slow to come around. But if you give them a reason, they will.

Plus, these games aren’t inexpensive. It blows my mind how much it costs to take a family of four to a baseball game. I’m not even talking about those Cost of Fan Index things the business mags do at the beginning of the year. I’m just talking about spending on four tickets, parking and some random snacks. With 162 games, you have to pick your spots. Do you want to go on a Tuesday night against the Twins? Or are you going to try to hit a weekend with a promotional giveaway? Where’s the best value?

My former bossman at SB Nation asked “When is it a good time to question the attendance?” I don’t know the answer to that. But I do know to question a fan base that has suffered through 29 years of some pretty lousy baseball is bad form.

As the attendance talk was evolving and as I was getting set to post some snarky comment about the Royals offense, something happened.

That’s it. That’s all I could muster. Alex Gordon gets a belt-high fastball and barely gets it over the wall. Walk off. Royals win.

Gordon_Walkoff

 

I mean, that’s just beautiful. I hit rewind at least 30 times. After I post this, I’ll watch it at least 10 more times before I go to bed.

It’s just another moment in a season that has been amazing.

There are a lot of flaws with this team. We saw them on display tonight when the Royals could only muster three hits off Ricky Nolasco. This offense has the nasty ability to hit the “off” switch a little too frequently for my liking. Before the Gordon home run, they had scored just two runs in their last 26 innings. This is a problem that’s not going away. Walk off home runs tend to obscure the issues I suppose. Some of you will be angry with me for even bringing it up at this point.

I’ve written this before, but I have no idea how this next month is going to play out for the Royals. They’re either going to win the division and go to the playoffs for the first time in almost three decades, or they’re going to flame out and miss everything. I’m not ignoring the flaws. I acknowledge them. But flawed teams win in baseball all the time. With 31 games remaining, the Royals are in a great position.

Whatever happens, I’m going to enjoy the hell out of this.