We don’t hear much from Royals owner David Glass. That’s probably a good thing, given his penchant for infuriating an already frustrated fan base. He usually grants a couple of interviews a year. One early in the spring, one at the end of a usually disappointing season and he will generally talk around the All-Star Break.

Royals beat writer Any McCullough sat down with Glass this week in Minneapolis. The Star published the entire Q&A online, which is a really good thing. As per my usual, I’ll grab a couple of snippets and we can discuss.

“I thought we’d be more consistent. At times, we’ve played extremely well. At times, we’ve played not so well. It’s the inconsistency that has surprised me. But we’re in a good position, I think, to make a run for the playoffs. If we have a good second half, there’s no reason why we can’t be in the playoffs.”

That pretty much sums up the season to this point. For me, the key to this comment is packed in the middle. “But we’re in a good position, I think, to make a run for the playoffs.” That may be stating the obvious as the team is 2.5 games out of the second Wild Card spot, but it’s nice the owner sees his team in position. (You know how I feel.) I know we treat everything Glass says with a healthy does of skepticism, but this is an expectation I don’t think we’ve heard from ownership at this point in the season. Yes, he’s allowed GMs to make some late season acquisitions in the past when the team was on the fringe of contention, but I don’t think he’s ever come out past the midway point of the season and proclaimed that they are in a good position to make a run for the playoffs. That’s usual the stuff we hear in March, when everyone is saying they have a shot at contention.
“I think they’ve (Dayton Moore and Ned Yost) both done a good job. Dayton is one of the best baseball people I know, and I’ve been around a lot of them for the last 60 years. And I think Ned is a very good manager. I think that he continues to grow as a manager. He’s got the balance that you need, as far as being a players’ manager, and also holding them accountable. I think that he does that.”

Is this a vote of confidence? I don’t think so, for the simple fact the Royals aren’t circling the drain at this point. In other words, Glass doesn’t need to give his management team a vote of confidence. Although we can disagree on this point.
“The one thing I’ve learned about Ned and Dayton both is they are as obsessed with winning as I am. All three of us have a real problem when we lose.”

How do you react when you lose?

“Not very good. You wouldn’t want to be around me.”

There are a couple of themes that run through this interview. One is “obsessed with winning.” It appears a couple of times in the transcript.

As I mentioned at the open of this post, Glass doesn’t speak much. My theory why this is, is because he’s extremely unpolished and has a penchant of saying some really crazy stuff that only serves to fan the flames of the fan base’s perception of negativity toward him. Except I didn’t read anything crazy in this transcript. He seemed almost… Coached. Is it possible, that after nearly 20 years at the helm in various capacities of this franchise that he’s finally had some media coaching.

I don’t just want to win, I’m OBSESSED with WINNING, dammit!

The second response above just kind of cracks me up. I don’t buy it.

“I think Dayton’s done a good job of putting this team together… And he and Dan (Glass) work closely together. Both of them believe that we’ve got a good enough team to win the division. In my mind, watching the team and interfacing with them, I think we’re good enough to make the playoffs. We just need to crank it up and make it happen.”

I pulled this quote because I think it’s another example of where Glass has received some PR coaching. Moore and Dan Glass work closely together? I’ve never been impressed with Dan Glass. Ever. However, he is the next in the ownership line. Dad is greasing the skids for his son. If there’s success, Dan Glass will damn sure get a portion of the spotlight. Second, Glass mentions he not only watches the team, he “interfaces” with them. This is always a criticism about Glass and his ownership. Many see him as an absentee owner, content to watch the team from afar, if at all. I don’t know that I’ve ever bought into that narrative. I also don’t know that it matters. Do we really want the owner heavily involved? Hire your baseball people and stay the hell out of the way. It seems Glass has been doing that since Moore was hired. But he’s not detached.

“Our objective has always been to try to break even. I guess you’ll have a year where you might make a little. But you might have years where you lose money. Over a period of time, we’d like to come close to breaking even, at least. And you try to fit it into that framework. But if you have an opportunity to win, you consider doing almost anything.”

More coaching.

I’ve been on Glass for years now about what exactly represents the break even point. Last November, he was deservedly ripped when he talked team financials.

But this is the new David Glass: Hey, we make money some years, we lose money some others. He learned to avoid specifics. Good student.

What would it mean to you for this team to reach the playoffs?

“It would mean that Dan and I picked the right people to do the job. Kansas City deserves a winner. It’s a great baseball town. The people in Major League Baseball still talk to me about the All-Star Game here, and how the cooperation they got from the Royals, the way the fans supported it, the way the city supported it, is unique. Better than what they were accustomed to experiencing.

“They rave about Kansas City and the fans and the city and the organization. It’s a great baseball town. And these fans deserve in the playoffs. They deserve to be able to support a winner. And if you go to The K, and we’re playing, and we’re playing well, and it’s an exciting game, and you’ve got a big crowd, it is really fun to watch how much they get into the game. It’s not like they’re just kind of casual fans. They get excited about it.

“They deserve it. All of us deserve it. I’m a fan, too.”

For some reason the mainstream media kind of likes to have a go at the fans from time to time. We’ve been portrayed as impatient, irrational and stubborn. My counter is to root for a team that hasn’t played a meaningful game in 29 years. Glass may be pandering to the fans here, but let’s be honest, that’s something he kind of needs to do. I don’t mean pandering in the pejorative. What Glass said is not heavy-handed. He’s paying tribute to us in this quote. We’re knowledgeable and passionate. We “deserve” it.

I can’t disagree with that.

Finally, at the end of the quote above, Glass mentions that he’s a “fan” as well. Four times in that transcript, Glass mentions he’s a fan. I’m telling you, the investment in his media coaching is paying dividends.

Overall, I enjoyed the interview. Which is a strange thing to write when it comes to Glass. He comes across as tuned into the situation with his team and is an owner who is largely hands-off in letting his baseball people run the show. I won’t go so far as to call him a “model” owner. I will give him credit for learning on the job. And that’s something.