Sunday morning, the Royals made some transaction news when they shoved Danny Valencia to the disabled list and recalled Mike Moustakas from him Triple-A sojourn.

Moustakas played seven games for Omaha. Overall, he hit .355/.412/.548 in 34 plate appearances. Solid, no? Or you could dive a little deeper inside the number and see that most of that damage was done in his last two games when he went 6-8 with a pair of doubles. Either way, it’s semantics. We’re parsing the smallest of sample sizes. He got off to a slow start in Omaha, went on one of his patented mini hot streaks and got a recall when the Royals disabled Valencia.

What exactly is going on in the front office? You have a player who has seen his production slip for three consecutive seasons. This player has the fourth worst wRC+ among American League hitters with at least 130 plate appearances. A player who was hitting .153/.225/.323 in 130 plate appearances at the time of his demotion. And apparently, all he needed was seven games in Triple-A.

I get that no one is saying he’s “fixed.” Because you can’t wash away 1,600 subpar major league plate appearances with a handful of at bats in the minors. But if you’re going to send down a guy who has struggled nearly every single day of his major league career, why on Earth would you do such an abrupt about-face? What purpose was the demotion supposed to serve?

The only thing I can think of was the demotion was meant to be a wakeup call to Moustakas. Maybe the Royals thought he needed a kick in the ass. A fire lit under his attitude and motivation. Because I can’t imagine why else he would be down to Omaha and back just 10 days later. It just makes no sense.

Christian Colon and Johnny Giavotella are options. Both are on the 40-man roster. Pedro Ciriaco is already here. Or you could recall recently demoted Jimmy Paredes. None of the above are what you would consider good – or even acceptable – options. The cupboard is bare. There is no depth. Which is another story altogether.

The Moustakas demotion was long overdue. His promotion was premature. There are no winners in this. So very Royals.

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On Friday, Dayton Moore gave Ned Yost a sort of vote of confidence:

“Here’s the bottom line: It’s not Ned, it’s not Pedro (Grifol), it’s me,” Moore said. “I’m responsible. It’s all on me. At least that’s the way I feel about it.”

“It’s my job to give the managers and the coaching staff the right players to succeed. I have to be able to give them the tools to win. So if we’re not succeeding, ultimately the responsibility comes back to me. No one else.”

We have a tendency to parse everything Moore says. Especially when he says stuff to Jeff Flanagan, who gets some of the more choice quotes from our favorite general manager. But this… I don’t know. It doesn’t seem particularly noteworthy to me. It’s a general manager who remains under fire from a fan base fed up with eight years of underachieving baseball. He’s saying what he’s supposed to be saying.

And here’s the (not really) funny thing: He hasn’t given his staff the tools to win. Ever. Or more importantly, he’s hired the wrong guys who are supposed to shape and mold the players that are supposed to make up the pipeline of major league talent. There has been a systematic failure of player development, bad drafts and regression at the major league level. Moore hired the coaches and scouts who have brought us this debacle. Moore is responsible for all of this.

It’s on him. Duh.

I stand behind what I wrote nearly a year ago at Royals Review.

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And finally, Nori Aoki. Yeah. We all thought he would be a little better than this. But there is entertainment. I’m all for entertainment.

aokinuts

From our friends at Fansided. Very nice. Have a good Monday. And wear a cup.