The Royals traded Danny Valencia on Monday to the Toronto Blue Jays. In exchange, they received minor leaguers Liam Hendriks and Erik Kratz.

I know with the trade deadline approaching, there’s been a ton of talk about the Royals being either “buyers” or “sellers.” This ignores the more obvious middle ground of the “stand paters.” Or the “standing pats.” While this trade is technically a transaction, this has a “stand pat” kind of vibe.

Since this seems to be the case, let’s look at a few ramifications of this trade:

— The Royals just made a trade with a team two games ahead of them in the Wild Card standings.

Forget for a moment there are other teams between the Royals and the Jays for the final Wild Card spot. Why on Earth would you help a rival for a postseason position. I know all GMs say the right things. They want each team to come out of a trade looking good. Win-win and all that. That’s understandable when a club sends a player to another league, or when a selling team at the deadline trades off major league assets for a couple of prospects. But why if the team you’re allegedly chasing in the standings needs a right-handed bat, would you provide said bat for them? Especially on who hits .333/.369/.510 against southpaws for his career? (Valencia is hitting a robust .354/.386/.492 against lefties this season.) I just don’t get it.

— Valencia has a… reputation.

There are a certain subset of major league players who have – let’s call it delusions – as to their value and skill. Valencia has always chafed at the “lefty masher” tag and has insisted he can clobber all pitchers. The stats say otherwise. Yet that hasn’t stopped him from jockeying for increased playing time. Not that I blame the guy. He’s a competitor. But when you see yourself one way and your bosses see you in a different light, that can be a little awkward. And word is, Valencia isn’t the greatest guy to be around sometimes.

We know the Royals pay lip service to the culture of the clubhouse, which kind of made his acquisition a little strange last winter. Maybe he finally wore out his welcome in Kansas City.

— The Royals officially believe in Mike Moustakas.

I didn’t know where to place this. Good? Or bad? Depends on your perspective, I suppose. The Royals will tell you he’s been great since his exile in Omaha, hitting a team high nine home runs since the first of June. The other numbers don’t paint as nice of a picture. Since his return to the bigs, Moustakas is hitting .231/.292/.449. Yes, that’s better than when he was shipped out. But let’s face it, if that’s how we’re judging Moose, you can’t set the bar any lower.

Moustakas has been a streaky hitter throughout his career. He also has power potential. I don’t think what we’ve seen over the last two months signals a rebirth or even a hot streak. Look at those numbers above again. This is probably who Moustakas is going forward. That means he needs a platoon partner. That the Royals are gambling on Moustakas being “fixed” or whatever, seems misguided.

But the Royals do seem to give certain players in their organization a lot of rope.

— Christian Colon breaks free from the shackles of Omaha.

Colon is hitting .307/.361/.430 for the Storm Chasers and has seen his extra base hit totals spike over the last month or so of action. The former fourth overall draft pick will never live up to the status that comes with that selection, but he can be a useful part on a team that lacks depth on the infield. He can play second, third, and short (along with some outfield) which gives the Royals some desired versatility. Also, at the major league minimum salary, he’s as affordable as they come.

I’ve always said that Dayton Moore struggles with roster math – the art of assembling a coherent 25-man roster. In other words, I’m not surprised the Royals have had what looks to be a decent option in the minors to fill the utility infield void. It seems like Colon should have been up a long time ago.

— Pitching remains the currency of baseball.

Two years ago, Hendriks was rated as the Twins seventh-best prospect by Baseball America.

“His fastball sits at 86-92 mph and peaks at 94. He uses both two- and four-seamers, complementing his sinker with a solid slider. When he’s in rhythm, Hendriks peppers the bottom of the zone and commands his fastball to his arm side, allowing him to induce weak contact with his slider and above-average changeup on the other side of the plate… He has an outside chance of becoming a No. 3 starter.”

A year later, Hendriks was claimed off the Twins by the Cubs, who then lost him to a claim by the Orioles, who then had him claimed by the Jays. That’s three waiver claims in three months for a former prospect. He’s thrown 169 major league innings with a 6.06 ERA and 5.38 FIP. Hendriks has had success this season in Triple-A, posting a 2.33 ERA and 2.52 FIP. He also has a ground ball rate of around 50 percent with a 22 percent whiff rate. Very solid numbers for Triple-A. Is it possible he’s figured things out? He had similar success before in Triple-A, back in 2012.

But we do know how the Royals have taken fringe starters and found value from them in the bullpen.

— Kratz is a backup catcher.

Hence the release of Brett Hayes. I dunno. This seems like a shuffling of deck chairs. Kratz has some power potential that Hayes lacks, but really… We’re talking about Salvador Perez’s backup. It’s not like the guy is going to play all that much.

Final thoughts

It’s a trade that really elicits a shrug of the shoulders, except I can’t get over the fact the Royals got a pair of role players for someone who will fill a hole in the lineup for a team whom they are competing against for a playoff spot. I wonder if the Royals checked the standings before making the trade.