Utilizing an offensive attack that can be described as equal parts anemic and pathetic, the Royals lost to the fading Twins on Thursday.

Kansas City mustered just four hits on the night. Two of them were bunts. From Mike Moustakas and Eric Hosmer. That’s how awful it was. They were somehow able to get two runners on base at once in the fourth and in the eighth. Heady times. Except in the fourth Kendrys Morales hit into a fielders choice and Sal Perez struck out looking. Looking! In the eighth, Lorenzo Cain went down on strikes and Hosmer rolled it over and hit a harmless ground ball to second.

That’s your offensive attack in a nutshell.

On the other hand, the Minnesota offense was doing everything it could to give the game away. They had five extra base hits, but ran into two outs on the bases. Except they had two hits in 12 chances with runners in scoring position. The Royals had no hits in five chances in a similar situation.

There’s a lot of hand-wringing over a four-game losing streak. I guess that’s to be expected when you are the defending AL champions. Although I’m contractually obligated to point out the team is still in first place in the AL Central and they own the second best winning percentage in the league. Houston is at .580. Kansas City is at .579. This four game skid is the second time all year the team has lost four games. They have also had one three game losing streak. If you’re looking for something that will get you off the ledge, maybe that little factoid above is what will accomplish that. This time last year, the team had already run through a couple of four-game losing streaks and had lost five in a row for added measure.

Losing streaks aren’t fun, but they are a fact of baseball. The good teams minimize those plateaus. I still think the Royals are a good team.

Having said that, the blame for this rests solely on the shoulders of the offense.

Small sample size caveat ahead:

RoyalsLosing4

That’s the Royals offensive output the last four games, courtesy the Baseball Musings Day by Day Database. And it’s pretty ugly. The only Royal hitting with distinction is Cain. The only other Royal who gets on base is Alex Gordon. And the hottest guy on the squad (in this smallest of samples) is Jerrod Dyson and he can’t get a regular game in the lineup. Look at Escobar (.083 OBP) and Moustakas (.125 OBP). The top two hitters in this lineup aren’t doing their job and setting the table. Although with the middle of the order stinking it up, I’m not sure that matters so much.

This is the Royals offense. No, I’m not saying they’re this awful. I’m saying that they are prone to disappearing acts. This is what happens when you collectively preach contact and eschew working the count and taking your share of walks. At some point the BABIP Gods will frown and when they do, you get a table like the one above.

The Royals team walk rate of 5.7 percent is low. It’s historically low. And it’s a problem. You can’t score if you can’t get on base. League average this year is 7.5 percent. Here are the bottom five teams as ranked by walk rate:

Colorado – 6.3%
Chicago White Sox – 6.2%
Milwaukee – 6.1%
Philadelphia – 6.0%
Kansas City – 5.7%

Among those teams, only Colorado and Kansas City score more runs that the league average. Colorado is always the offensive exception. Only Kansas City has a winning record.

We remember this is the same position the Royals occupied last year and they made it to the seventh game of the World Series. It’s possible to win and despise the walk. But if you’re going to do that, you’re also going to have stretches where your offense goes walkabout.