It was a dominant turn. The likes we haven’t seen since October of last year.

Mostly, it was cause for a sigh of relief.

Yordano Ventura, the hurricane of bizarre pitching performances so far in 2015, turned in by far his best start of the season. His performance was key in the Royals 3-0 win over the Reds, which secured back to back shutouts for the Royals for the first time in 23 years.

His final line:

7 IP, 4 H, 0 R, o BB, 6 SO. He threw 88 pitches, 54 of them for strikes.

And… Exhale.

The shenanigans of April overshadowed the fact Ventura was getting off to a semi-decent start. In outings ended by either cramps or ejections, he was strong in three of them. His worse start was the debacle at The K against Oakland. It was after all of the hubbub of the early season that really caused concern. In his three starts following the kerfuffle in Chicago, Ventura threw just over 18 innings, allowing 14 runs while walking nine batters against just 11 strikeouts. Most alarmingly, his velocity in those starts was down.

Neither command, runs or velocity was an issue on Tuesday.

In those three starts, Ventura got a swing and a miss six percent of the time. On Tuesday, he missed bats 10 percent of the time. He didn’t go to a three-ball count until old friend Brayan Pena worked him full with two outs in the bottom of the third. (Pena eventually went down swinging.) If you want to get really micro, Ventura’s worst match-up came leading off the top of the seventh when Todd Frazier took the first three pitches out of the strike zone. Ventura adjusted, taking a little off a “get-me-over” fastball to go 3-1 before he got him to foul out.

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After the game, it was revealed that in his previous start, Ventura struggled with tear in the fingernail of his right index finger. That issue flared up again late in the sixth inning. Easy to see why he missed early starting the seventh.

Yet Ventura rallied and got the next two batters. For his final batter of the evening, Brandon Phillips, Ventura was still throwing smoke, topping out at 99 mph on his fastball. According to normalized PitchF/X data collected by Brooks Baseball, Ventura averaged 97.6 mph on his fastball and topped out at 100.5 mph. From the velocity chart, you can see how he got stronger in the middle innings and then was able to maintain his velocity through a crafty mix of his four-seam and two-seam fastballs.

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One trend that we’ve seen slowly revealed this season with Ventura is his increasing ground ball rate. We saw that to the extreme on Tuesday as 11 of the 14 outs he recorded on balls in play were hit on the ground. Overall for 2015, Ventura has a 2.3 GB/FB ratio and his 55 percent ground ball rate is by far the highest of his career. Strikeouts and ground balls… That’s a nifty way to make a living. And as we saw, it’s nearly impossible for the opposition to do any kind of damage when that’s the recipe Ventura is cooking.

Since that start against Chicago, Ventura has slowly been regaining his velocity. Tuesday was the pinnacle of his rebound.

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Ventura said it was the best he has felt all year, and that was incredibly obvious. It was a masterful performance. He will always be measured against his efforts in Game Six, which may not always be fair, but that’s was such a great outing that it can’t be helped. Let’s just say that if you had flashbacks to that October night while watching him work on a cold, rainy May night against another National League opponent, it wouldn’t be strange. It was that kind of performance.

Welcome back, Ventura.