“Guys are what they are. You’re not going to say ‘OK, take more pitches.’ That doesn’t work. They play their game. Nights like tonight, when a guy’s on his game, you’re going to get what we got tonight.”

Ned Yost as quoted in the Kansas City Star.

I got Vine, specifically for Ned’s soundbites. Embedded in a Tweet here.

It’s an interesting comment from Yost. Born of frustration, most certainly, after being force-fed another abysmal offensive performance on Tuesday against the Minnesota Twins. Five hits through nine (with two of those leading off the ninth) and a 2-1 scoreline that made it look closer than it actually was. The Royals were never in this game.

At the All-Star Break, I wrote this was a crucial stretch for the Royals if they harbored any true hopes of October baseball. We are 11 games into a 13 game stretch. The Royals are 5-6. They have lost a game and a half in the Wild Card standings, but more importantly, they have been passed by the Yankees and the Blue Jays and still trail the Mariners. And don’t look now, but the Rays, counted out a couple of months ago, are streaking and are just a single game behind the Royals.

I said I’d give them 13 games, but the returns through 11 aren’t encouraging. The Royals are scuffling to stay at .500 both in this stretch and in the season. We’re over 100 games into 2014. As Ned would say, this is who they are. They are going to land somewhere between 79 and 83 wins. They are not going to make the playoffs. The offense won’t allow it.

Which brings me back to Yost’s comment from last night. Pretty damning, isn’t it? A public acknowledgement that his team doesn’t know how to work the count and doesn’t know how to have what you would consider to be a professional at bat. And while we can certainly be outraged (or any other emotion) about how this team performs, this lack of discipline isn’t on Yost. It’s on the architect of the team. The guy charged with assembling a coherent 25-man roster. This is Dayton Moore’s fault.

Look at Kyle Gibson’s strike zone plot from last night.

Gibson_Plot

Find the cluster of dark red in the lower left. Look at the dark red and the off yellow in the lower right. See the dark red and the blue in the upper left. All pitches outside of the strike zone. All swung at by inept Royal batters. Of Gibson’s 95 pitches, I count 26 out of the strike zone that the Royals couldn’t resist. That’s an undisciplined team.

And we know what happens when they make contact: Singles. Lots and lots of singles. No walks, no power, and a plethora of singles leads you to score an average of 3.97 runs per game. Well below the league average of 4.24 runs per game. This offense doesn’t stink. It’s rancid.

But as Yost said, they are who they are. In a simple post-game comment, Yost gave us more evidence (as if we needed any more) that Dayton Moore isn’t fit to assemble a major league roster.