The trade deadline passed with the Royals engaged as bystanders. They stood by as teams surrounding them decided to become buyers (Yankees, Mariners) or sellers (Indians, Rays).

In the aftermath, Dayton Moore gave a press conference. I enjoy the heck out of these. Equal parts paranoia and defensiveness, it’s breathtaking to watch.

Here are a few choice quotes:

We gotta concentrate on who the players are and who we are and not necessarily what the payroll is. It’s always a factor. I can’t speak for anyone else, but you see some of the players that went today and there’s money exchanged for a reason. There are certain players available to certain teams for a reason. It’s just the way it works.

The first part of that statement is just kind of gobbledygook. It just makes no sense to me. I’ve replayed it a number of times and it just sounds like a guy who has no answers trying to give an answer. And failing.

The second part makes a little more sense, but still comes off as defensive. Although Dayton then played the small market card.

There’s an economic analysis taking place with every player. We’re not going to apologize for our market and what we can and can’t do. But there are certainly limitations.

I love that. “Hey, I’m not going to use this as an excuse, but… It’s the reason why nothing happened.” Hilarious. Singing the small market blues again.

The Oakland A’s Opening Day payroll was $82 million. They own the best offense in the AL. They play in a stadium that leaks raw sewage into the dugout. They own the best record in baseball. They recently traded for Jeff Samardzija. And on Thursday, they acquired Jon Lester.

I’m sure there are limitations in Oakland. Yet somehow, they don’t use those as an excuse. In fact, I’m not even certain they acknowledge them. They work around them.

Go a little further. Remember how Moore has always said because of our market, the majority of the Royals lineup needs to be homegrown? How it’s the only way we can succeed?

Here’s Oakland’s lineup from MLB Depth Charts and how each player was acquired:

Coco Crisp – FA
John Jaso – Trade
Josh Donaldson – Trade
Brandon Moss – FA
Stephen Vogt – Trade
Derek Norris – Trade
Jed Lowrie – Trade
Josh Reddick – Trade
Eric Sogard – Trade

And their rotation:

Jeff Samardzija – Trade
Sonny Gray – Draft
Jon Lester – Trade
Scott Kazmir – Trade
Jason Hammel – Trade

The contrast between a successful GM and Dayton Moore is obvious. Billy Beane sees his players as assets he can use as an opportunity to improve his team. Dayton Moore seems to fall in love with his players. Somehow, in eight plus years as the general manager of a major league baseball team, Moore has made what I would classify as two big trades. The first was the Zack Greinke deal. The second was the Wil Myers trade. Billy Beane made two big trades this month. It’s criminal how long Dayton Moore holds on to his assets. Granted, he hasn’t had many “big” players to build “big” trades around, but he’s been loathe to move prospects as well. (Myers being the lone notable prospect.) There have been so many trades for bullpen parts and replacement level infielders, it makes the head spin.

What we have is a general manager who is, for whatever reason, gun shy to make an impactful deal. Just add it to the list of reasons for him to be removed from his position as General Manager.

There’s a lot of teams that would love to have some of our pitching in the rotation. But at the end of the day, where are you going to get that pitching back?

Ahh… To me this is the smoking gun. We are over eight years with Dayton Moore in charge and here he is telling us the minor league cupboard is bare. There is no pitching depth. There is no one in the minors ready to take a shot at the big leagues. The Omaha rotation has featured Aaron Brooks, Brett Tomko and Sugar Ray Marimon. John Lamb has had some good outings lately, but he’s not ready. Somehow, this part of The Process has gone completely off the rails. Pitching is the currency of baseball. How the hell did this happen?

We added Vargas, we added Infante, we added Aoki. We felt like we made some nice additions to our bullpen here this season already with some veteran guys. I feel like we improved upon our team. It’s important our current group of players produce and I believe we will.

I was waiting for this comment. The insistence the Royals have already done so much to improve their team. If you want to revisit the offseason, I’ll agree with Moore. Infante was a clear upgrade over the Getz parade at second. We thought Aoki was going to be decent in right. (We all were wrong.) And I think Vargas is realizing his upside as a serviceable rotation replacement for Ervin Santana.

Except we’re not talking about what the Royals did last winter. Every team made moves last winter. That’s what happens in baseball’s offseason. We are talking about what the Royals failed to do Thursday.

It’s a comment that reeks of failure. Which makes it the perfect Dayton Moore comment.

The second part is the same tired song and dance. The whole “our guys will improve” schtick. Please. Quit insulting the intelligence of your fanbase. Own up to the fact that maybe these guys you scouted, drafted, and signed aren’t as good as you thought they would be. Make some moves to rectify the situation. Maybe you’re “selling low” on a guy like Hosmer, but if this is the real Hosmer, you’re not going to get much anyway. Same for Moustakas. Package a few guys together who still have an upside with a commodity from your bullpen. Do something to improve your team. Do something.

This team isn’t much different from last year’s club. Last year, the Royals won 86 games. This year, they are three games over .500. We have seen this collection play for over 260 games. They are a slightly better than .500 team. That’s not good enough to get into the playoffs. And if you’re in that situation you either find a way to fill the holes on your team or you sell off your best assets in an attempt to rebuild and make another run next year.

That’s not Dayton Moore’s style. His style is to stand pat, safe in the knowledge another season hovering around the .500 mark will buy him some more time as a major league general manager. All the while other teams are aggressively either improving their teams or positioning themselves for a rebuild.

Not the Royals. The Royals continue to tread water in a sea of mediocrity.