It was in the bottom of the seventh inning, when the Royals were behind by a run, that I felt a sense of serenity. I was centered. Locked into a Zen-like state, I thought to myself, “The Royals are going to win this game.”

I didn’t yet know how. And I certainly didn’t Tweet out my feelings. (Check my feed sometime. I have a brilliant reverse jinx track record.) But there’s something about this team and this young season that I had all the confidence in the world.

And damn if they didn’t rally for two runs in the eighth to pull of yet another come from behind win. The 6-5 win was the Royals 11th on the season, pushed them into a first place tie with the Tigers in the Central and was their first one-run margin of the year. Nice.

It was just another ho-hum type of Royals games we’ve all come to expect. Timely hits, solid – and sometimes spectacular – defense, and a lockdown appearance from the bullpen. It feels like this has been written myriad times already (we’re only in April for crying out loud) but this winning methodology never gets old. Hell, winning never gets old. It’s just the way the Royals are doing it.. It’s fun and it feels sustainable.

— New Mike Moustakas continues to roll. Three hits in five plate appearances, driving in three runs. Naturally, two of the hits were opposite field knocks. We’re now in the third week of the season and his change in approach at the plate hasn’t seemed to have wavered. His spray chart is equal parts stunning and effective:

MooseSpray_042215

On Tuesday against Tommy Milone, I found myself thinking about his power. Milone’s fastball lives in the mid to upper 80s and his secondary stuff isn’t overwhelming. While he is a left-handed pitcher, his arsenal is such that he’s the type of pitcher a locked-in Moustakas should sit on and – with a favorable or early count – try to pull. And damn if he didn’t do that in the fifth inning.

It wasn’t a moon shot by any stretch, but the ball when far enough to reach the Twins bullpen. The guy is just doing so much right at the plate. That was just the 10th home run of his career against a lefty.

Fast-forward to the eighth inning as the Royals are rallying. Paulo Orlando is at third with two outs. Moustakas steps to the plate. The Twins counter with their closer, left-handed Glen Perkins. Perkins gets ahead of Moustakas 0-2 and serves a 94 mph fastball on the outer half of the plate that is returned and lined to left field for the go-ahead single. Had this scenario happened last year – or any other time in Moustakas’s career – we all know how it would have turned out. (I’m thinking pop-up in foul territory on the third base side or a ground out to the right side of the infield as he rolled over on the pitch.) Instead, ballgame.

The big hits keep coming, no matter who is on the mound. For the short season, Moustakas is hitting lefties at a .333/.419/.556 clip. Small sample caveats all around, but I’m fairly certain he’s never had a stretch like this where he’s hit everyone like he’s Ted Freakin’ Williams.

— Eric Hosmer isn’t hitting for much power early in the season, but he’s just getting on base and letting the bottom half of the lineup do their thing. Another day and three more walks for the first baseman. His OBP is now .419, second highest on the team.

— If we’re going to talk about plate discipline or good approaches at the plate, we have to bring up Paulo Orlando. When he’s not hitting triples, he’s simply giving the Royals great plate appearances. This guy is so impressive. He came through once again in the eighth following a Sal Perez single with one of his own to get the rally going.

I know there’s much love in these parts for Jarrod Dyson, but Orlando has shown enough in the small sample to officially be named the Royals fourth outfielder.

— The Royals +35 run differential is the best in the league. On the offense, it’s not difficult to figure why. Check the lineup Ned Yost rolls out night after night. Moustakas, Lorenzo Cain, Hosmer and Kendrys Morales are all off to hot starts with OBPs over .400. Gordon after them is warming up and Sal Perez is scorching at the plate as well. When all the tumblers in the middle of the order are clicking, you’re going to plate some runs.

— I feel like I’ve ignored the bullpen, but I suppose that’s what happens when they shut down the opposition night after night. On Tuesday, just 3.1 innings of scoreless baseball. The bullpen has now thrown 42.1 innings and allowed just three runs. I’ll save you the hassle of reaching for your calculator. That’s a 0.64 ERA.

The Royals go for the sweep Wednesday night. Roll on.