Royals Authority

Long Live The Process

Browsing Posts tagged Paulo Orlando

Earlier today, it was Alex Gordon and his wrist.  Just a few hours later, it has become Alex Rios and his hand.  Broken, you know.  Out indefinitely.

Lots of speculation with this news, not the least of which was the removal of Terrance Gore from his AA game today.  In combination with the speedster already being on the 40 man roster, one would be led to believe that Gore will take Rios’ spot on the 25 man roster.  I don’t hate it.

After all, it took six games and an injury to get Jarrod Dyson into live action and, far as we can tell, neither Eric Kratz or Christian Colon really exist.  This is not a team or a manager that is going to utilize the bench very much. Quite frankly, if you want strategery, Gore is probably more likely to see action than say a Whit Merrifield or someone of that ilk.

In the regular lineup, it appears that Jarrod Dyson and Paulo Orlando will platoon and likely do so in right field with Lorenzo Cain staying in center. Dyson, I assume because he is small and fast, is perceived as not having a good arm.  Truthfully, Dyson’s arm is no worse than average, probably not a lot different than that of Cain.  I like the idea of the guy playing everyday (Cain) staying in one spot, where he might be better than Dyson anyway.  So, keeping Lorenzo in center and leaving rightfield to Dyson and Orlando makes sense to me and likely leads to better overall defense than the Royals were getting out of Rios.  That is, by the way, not a criticism of Rios’ early season defense, but more a compliment for the amount of ground Dyson can cover.  It should also be noted that Orlando is considered a superb defender with a very good arm.

The Royals are not blessed with a ton of major league ready depth, but they actually were assembled to, at minimum, get by with an injury to the very player who got hurt.  Write this down, because I’m sure it has never been said before, are part of the game.  This is as good a time and as tolerable a position to take the hit as the Royals could hope for.  It’s not the best situation, but it is far from the worst.

Remain calm, everyone.  Don’t panic.


It’s as if 2014 never ended. We are suspended in time, just before the clock strikes midnight on December 31, 2014. In sweeping the Chicago White Sox for their first three wins of the new season, the Royals proved they haven’t lost their touch from last October.

The Royals polished off the Sox in myriad ways. They won the blowout (Monday), the comeback (Wednesday) and the pitching and defense special with the timely hit (Thursday). They say there is more than one way to skin a cat and likewise, there is more than one way to win a ballgame. The Royals provided three days of evidence of that.

On Thursday, it was newcomer Edinson Volquez who provided the quality start. In his Royals debut, Volquez spun eight innings of . He mixed equal parts sinker, change and knuckle-curve to keep the Sox off balance all afternoon. And the spotty command that has plagued him in the past? Didn’t happen on Thursday. Volquez issued a lone walk all day. It came in the seventh just after he hit Adam LaRoche with two outs. Lots of hit batters and LaRoche was the guy Duffy threw behind on Wednesday. Bad blood brewing.

Anyway, on Volquez, all his pitches were working and he was keeping the ball down in the zone. He threw first pitch strikes to 20 of the 29 batters he faced and with his sinker, he collected eight ground ball outs. And on those times he gave up fly balls, Lorenzo Cain had Jackson County covered.

Pitching and defense. Defense and pitching.

My concern about Volquez has been his history of poor command which has plagued him for pretty much his entire career. (Although a certain illustrator for the Kansas City Star will tell you career stats don’t carry as much weight as your last eight to ten days.) Prior to his start, I set his over/under for walks at 4.5. As I mentioned above, he walked one. For a guy who, just two seasons ago was walking over five batters per game, that’s an outright success.

I remain skeptical about the long-term success of Volquez, but after watching Ervin Santana and Jason Vargas come to Kansas City and pitch with a relative amount of success, maybe Dayton Moore and the Royals brain trust have indeed found a magic formula in regards to starting pitching. Hell, he’s done it on defense.

— The Royals have five home runs in three games. It’s inevitable that this will draw comparisons to last year’s power-averse club. So for reference, last year it took the Royals five times longer to hit five home runs. (That’s 15 games for the mathematically challenged.)

It was Salvador Perez who drove the bus to DongTown with a blast to left that plated Kendrys Morales in the sixth that knocked out starter John Danks.

I don’t think you will find a Royals fan (a rational one, anyway) who will claim the Royals are the second coming of the ’27 Yankees, but this qualifies as a notable development. And a good one.

— Paulo Orlando made his major league debut and collected his first hit with a triple in the bottom of the fifth. How can you not root for this guy? Grinding for 10 years in the minors, acquired for the long forgotten Horacio Ramirez in August of 2008, he’s paid his dues. Good for him. I saw on Twitter that Orlando went home to third in under 11 seconds. He will fit right in with this team.

Just when you thought it was safe to visit Royals Authority, I come back.  I have been busy, lazy, working, traveling…hell, I even spent a week playing baseball in Arizona.  Basically, I haven’t written in a while and certainly did not need to as Craig has been more than capably running the ship.

Of course, once one returns, one certainly wants to make a splash.  Hence, let’s profile Paulo Orlando.

There was a time when I spent as much time following prospects and ‘maybe they might become prospects’ as I did the major league Royals. Even before the great run of last fall, I had become far less interested in who was coming up  and far more interested in how was already up. The Royals had become relevant, or at least somewhat relevant, and featured players in the majors who had actual potential as opposed to say, Terrance Long. While I fear disappointment this season, the situation is far better now than back when I was trying to squint hard enough to Paulo Orlando the next Willie Wilson.

Orlando is now twenty-nine years old and has yet to log an inning in the majors, or even sit the bench for a week or two in September. He has spent six and one-half of his nine professional seasons in the Royals organization and is coming off his second full year in AAA.  As far as Brazilian baseball players go, Paulo is one of the best. Sadly, Brazil is no Dominican Republic.

The long and lean outfielder enjoyed his best seasons in back to back years at Northwest Arkansas.  He batted .305 at AA in both 2010 and 2011, got on base at a clip north of .360 and showed power and speed.  In between his fine AA performances those two years, however, was a flameout in 58 games at the AAA level in 2011.  Which buried him back in AA for all of 2012.  That season, Orlando’s power disappeared and took the rest of his offensive game with it.

For lack of anything else to do with him, the Royals moved Orlando to Omaha again in 2013 where he was marginally okay and improved, in 2014, to at least decently league average in a hitter’s league. If you squint right, maybe you can see him as a fourth outfielder or platoon partner in the majors, but I quit squinting when Sal Perez and Eric Hosmer came up.

What I see now is a 29 year old outfielder who can play good defense at all three positions (Orlando has played more than half his games in center, most of the rest in right, but enough in left that it is not uncharted territory).  He can run and steal a base, although he is not in the class of Gore or Dyson…or Escobar and Cain for that matter.  If you think getting hit by a pitch is a skill, than Orlando has that in his tool chest and he can bunt a little, too.

Let’s face it, kids, if Paulo Orlando was born ten years earlier, he would have played in the majors for Kansas City:  taking a spot alongside Ruben Mateo and Abraham Nunez (not that one, the other one).  Those are times thankfully long gone.  The Royals’ fourth outfielder is Jarrod Dyson, who is a pretty decent ballplayer if used correctly (and okay even when not).  Guys like Paulo Orlando actually have to earn it these days.

To be fair, Orlando was a raw, raw player when he became a professional.  He has gone from striking out 28% of the time and walking just 3% of the time to a guy who struck out an acceptable 15.5% last season and walked at a 7% clip. He boasts a good BABIP throughout his career – no long enough to make you think it can’t all be luck, even in the minors.

Still, this is a right-handed hitting outfielder with good (really good) defense, good (not great) speed, some ability to do a smattering of the ‘little things’.  However, he is twenty-nine with vanishing power and is three years removed from his last ‘look at me’ minor league campaign.

Stranger things have happened in baseball than for Paulo Orlando to enjoy major league success.  Frankly, Mike Aviles was similarly stuck in the system and not really popping anyone’s eyes and had one great plus one decent season for the Royals. While I will take a shot or two or nine at the Royals’ organization, the fact that Orlando was given a 40 man roster spot at least indicates they see something of worth.

It is not outside the realm of impossibility.  An injury (or just plain disinterest – call it pulling a Juan Gone) to Rios could give Orlando a chance as a platoon partner for Jarrod Dyson.  Who knows?  He might hit.  There’s part of me that would like to see that.

Way back when I thought I knew prospects, back when Chip Ambres was infesting the outfield of my favorite major league team, I envisioned Paulo Orlando as a guy who could make the major league team better. Chances are that ship has sailed.

When Paulo reports for camp, his locker will likely be on the opposite side of the room from that of Alex Gordon.  The side where they put the guys who are not expected to make the big league club, where the guys with the offensive linemen numbers hang out.  After nine professional seasons and zero big league at-bats, that is where Paulo Orlando finds himself.





I’ll be honest, I don’t have an opinion on the new name of the Royals’ Triple-A affiliate.   My only real opinion is that I don’t like teams changing names, be it good or bad, and as such the new Omaha Stormchasers is nothing that gets me excited.

What does get me excited, however, is the Omaha team’s possible lineup next April.   Perhaps as much as anything else, it will represent just how much potential progress the Royals’ organization has made under Dayton Moore.

After years of being the depository of has-beens, almosts and never-weres, the Omaha Royals/Stormchasers are going to offer a somewhat breathtaking array of talent when they take the field next April.   Gone are the days of Brian Buchanan, Gookie Dawkins, Seth Etherton and Brandon Duckworth (all fine humans, I’m sure, but not exactly the solution to any major league problem that might arise during a season).   Instead, the Stormchasers might well roll out this lineup when they open up in their new stadium next spring:

Derrick Robinson, CF

Johnny Giavotella, 2B

Mike Moustakas, 3B

Eric Hosmer, 1B

Clint Robinson, DH

David Lough, RF

Paulo Orlando, LF

Jeff Bianchi, SS

Manny Pina, C

It may be a stretch to have Bianchi at shortstop that early, but he should figure into the mix at some point.   It is also possible that David Lough could well open 2011 in Kansas City, but for now we will start him off in Omaha.

When you couple this lineup with what is likely to be a bullpen stocked with near major league ready homegrown talent (Louis Coleman, Blaine Hardy, and a starting rotation which at some point will include Mike Montgomery, Danny Duffy, John Lamb and Chris Dwyer (maybe even Aaron Crow), it will be hard to resist making a trek or two to Omaha in 2011.

While the organizational pitching depth is near legendary status at this point, the real positive about the Omaha roster next season is the position players who are not on it.

Just a rung below, we are likely to see Wil Myers (be it at catcher or in the outfield), middle infielder of the near future Christian Colon and catching prospect Salvador Perez.   When is the last time you could look at the AA and AAA batting orders and say with some degree of confidence that there were five or six future major league regulars playing?

2011 might well be a tough year to be a Kansas City Royals’ fan, but if you can tolerate the new name, it will be a fun year to be a fan of the Stormchasers.

%d bloggers like this: